Set up a road trip back home for Tet

Ho Chi Minh City Many young people invite each other to “go on a tour” to return home to celebrate Tet on a journey thousands of kilometers long, passing through famous beautiful roads.

About 2-3 weeks before Tet, members of backpacking groups on Facebook start calling each other and forming groups to drive home to celebrate Tet.

According to a survey in the Ho Chi Minh City area, the three most discussed routes are from Ho Chi Minh City to the Central region, through coastal localities; There are two directions from Ho Chi Minh City to the Central Highlands: to Da Lat or to Dak Nong, Dak Lak and from Ho Chi Minh City to the Western provinces.

This year, backpacking groups begin to depart from the 24th day of the lunar calendar (February 3). The route mainly lasts 2 days 1 night or 1 day and night.

The call to form a group to drive back to the hometown to celebrate Tet is rife among backpacking groups in the run-up to Tet.  Screenshots

The call to form a group to drive back to the hometown to celebrate Tet is rife among backpacking groups in the run-up to Tet. Screenshots

Nho Trung, working in Ho Chi Minh City, shared that on January 14, he posted on a backpacking group looking for teammates to drive home to celebrate Tet. Coming from Trung’s hometown in Quang Nam, this was the first time he rode a motorbike home instead of taking a bus or plane like every year. He believes that driving long distances back to his hometown, through coastal roads, is an experience that should be tried once in his life, to see beautiful scenery that cannot be seen clearly when traveling by other means of transport.

Trung plans to drive from Ho Chi Minh City to Quang Nam on the 24th of the lunar calendar (February 3). After two weeks of looking for companions, Trung’s group now has 3 people driving 2 cars. The group departed from Saigon, the last stop was in Tam Ky city, Quang Nam province. This stretch of road has many directions, the group chose to stick to the coastal roads rather than running entirely on the national highway to conveniently stop and admire the beautiful scenery.

The group plans to depart at 6:00 a.m. on February 3, run until 5:00 p.m. on the same day, then stop at Phu Yen, a famous tourist destination in the Central Coast region, and stay overnight here. The next day continue the journey, expected to arrive in Quang Nam around noon on February 4.

Trung estimates that the cost of gasoline for the nearly 900 km journey is about 1.4 million VND. Depending on the type of car, the level of fuel consumption varies, some cars only cost about 400,000 VND. Other costs such as meals and accommodation depend on each person’s needs.

“Along the way from Ho Chi Minh City to Quang Nam, there are many places to stay because they pass through famous tourist provinces such as Binh Thuan or Phu Yen,” Trung said.

Since it was his first time driving long distances back to his hometown, the thing that Trung was most concerned about was safety when driving. He said running at the right speed and controlling the speed, fully equipped with protective gear is extremely important.

Mr. Chien, living in Ho Chi Minh City, said this year he also rode his motorbike home to Quang Tri. These days, he is “calling” his companions to drive on the same road. Mr. Chien shared that his trip back to his hometown will go through 10 central coastal provinces including Binh Thuan, Ninh Thuan, Khanh Hoa, Phu Yen, Binh Dinh, Quang Ngai, Quang Nam, Da Nang, Hue and Quang Tri.

In addition to this coastal road, you can also go up to the Central Highlands, conquering the Indochina junction in Kon Tum and the eastern tip of Vietnam. The total route is 1,200 km but the continuous travel time is about 18-22 hours to complete.

Bau Trang Street in Hoa Thang commune, Bac Binh district, Binh Thuan is a check-in point for many tourists.  Photo: yenchee07

Bau Trang Street in Hoa Thang commune, Bac Binh district, Binh Thuan is a check-in point for many tourists. Photo: yenchee07

Mr. Chien estimates the cost to be 600,000-800,000 VND including gasoline and 3 meals. He and his group of friends will depart at 4:00 p.m. on December 26 (lunar calendar), drive through the night, and arrive in Quang Tri around December 27.

“Because we run long distances continuously, group participants are required to have vehicles of 150 cc or more. Travel 150-200 km before taking a break to refuel,” Mr. Chien said.

Regarding safety criteria, he requires group participants to wear a good helmet, with 3/4 face or full-face goggles, full body armor and saddle pads.

Mr. Minh Quan, who is producing vehicle content in Ho Chi Minh City, said that the trend of traveling back to his hometown for Tet appeared a few years ago but is always popular in backpacking groups every long holiday like April 30, 2019. /5 or Lunar New Year.

Mr. Tam rides a motorbike in Than Uyen town - Lai Chau.  Photo: Tran Thuong Tam

Mr. Quan once rode a motorbike in Than Uyen town – Lai Chau. Photo: Minh Quan

Not only during Tet, but almost every holiday, Mr. Quan drives back to his hometown in Can Tho. He said the route to the West is quite short, mostly national highways, without many attractive scenery like Ho Chi Minh City – Central region or Ho Chi Minh City – Central Highlands.

“From Ho Chi Minh City to Can Tho, you will go through a road right near Trung Luong intersection (Tien Giang). There is a small forest with many tall and large trees that is quite special. This scene may be familiar to many people from other places, but it is strange to people in the West because in the West there are mainly small, low forests,” Mr. Quan said.

He said that every time he drives back to his hometown, he usually rides with a group of friends about 2-3 cars. Having traveled many long routes, Mr. Quan believes that each group should have a maximum of 4 vehicles, and the group leader needs to have experience leading the group. In case of larger crowds, you need to drive in a zigzag pattern to easily observe the situation ahead. In addition, you need to bring enough identification documents and comply with road traffic safety laws.